Video How-to: Flush Coolant System and Change Coolant

“Change coolant every 2 years or 24,000 miles” is about all manufacturers will tell you about your coolant. But there’s a lot more to it than that – check out our how-to-video for helpful tips to make this messy, boring job a breeze!

“Change your coolant every 2 years or 24,000 miles.” That’s what the manufacturers usually tell you, there’s a lot more to it than just that!

In this video, we go over the differences between coolant and anti-freeze, and who should actually use what based on the climate where you live. Then we show you the full process of cleaning the entire cooling system on your sport bike with a mild acidic solution, then flushing it out and replacing it with fresh new coolant.

Check it out, and if your bike is due for a coolant change, get the products we used in this video here!

And don’t forget, please share our video with your motorcycle-riding buds too!

 

Do you have any tips for making a coolant flush and change on your bike easier? Let us know what they are in the comments below!

 

Video: How to Series – Introduction to Street Motorcycle Armor

We all know how much fun riding can be and what a great feeling it is to hit the road and get some seed time on our bikes but every time we ride, there’s a chance we could get hurt and on a motorcycle, those injuries could be serious. We have to take our own safety into our own hands on our bikes but by choosing to ride in the proper gear, we can make the difference between getting up and walking away from a crash or getting a ride in an ambulance to the hospital. So, in this installment of the BikeBandit Garage, we’re going to take a look at what you need to know about body armor for street riding.

Rob Fish here with bikebandit.com. Aside from a helmet, body armor can be the most important protective gear that you should be investing in, from jackets and gloves to full-race suits. Body armor is pretty much in everything that you should be wearing but how do you know what is right for you? There are a lot of types of high-quality body armor on the market and we want to educate you on the various kinds of armor that you can protect yourself with.

First of all, what exactly is armor? Well, not quite. Motorcycle armor is a combination of pieces you wear to minimize the energy transferred to your body in the event of a crash. Motorcycle armor is usually found in the highest impact areas of the body, like your elbows, your shoulders, your knees, your back so, it will not only absorb the forces of an impact but it also can protect your body from abrasion also known as road rash. Some kinds of armor are very affordable, and others more expensive so not so much, right? But no matter how much you spend on armor, it will be cheaper than your visit to the hospital so you can definitely call it an investment in your safety.

Now, there are completely different kinds of armor for dirt riding and street riding but in this video, we’re focusing on the street variety. Street protection is specifically designed for incidents where riders go down typically at higher speeds, usually encountering one major impact and then hopefully sliding to a stop. Now, how the gear is attached to the rider is also different than dirt gear and that it’s usually built-in to the garments themselves.

Let’s use this jacket as an example, at first glance, you have no idea that there’s any armor in some places. This is because it’s less smooth so that it doesn’t snag during a slide, which would cause you to start tumbling, what you don’t see is the various forearm, elbow, shoulder and spine protection that’s hidden inside. Just remember though, street armor and dirt armor are very different and you should not ride on the street in dirt armor because that’s not what it was designed for and it probably won’t protect you in a fall. So what exactly is a body armor made of? Well, that all depends on what you’re buying and the quality of the pieces.

Some pieces of body armor only provide padding between the rider’s body and potential high-contact areas, such as simple soft foams or maybe memory foams. Others may use foam against the rider’s body with a hard-plastic cup facing outwards and so others use modern technology that blends the benefits of both. Let’s look further into each of these and discuss their pros and cons.

First, when it comes to foam, there are many different types that come in various configurations. From soft to hard, with open or closed cells with each type providing different levels of comfort and protection.

Take, for instance, most basic foams are very comfortable but offer minimal impact resistance, whereas a harder closed-cell foam will offer more resistance but less comfort because of its stiffness. Basic foams are fairly inexpensive to produce so you’ll find it in the most basic apparel. On the other end of the spectrum, however, there are amazing foams out there that are soft, breathable and can handle much more impact energy.

Now, let’s take a look at memory type foam which is very dense and offer superior impact absorption when compared to its less expensive counterparts. Its downfall is that it rebounds a bit slower, and because of its higher cost to produce, you’ll likely only find it on premium brands such as this Poron XRD used by Klim. Hard cup armor also known as GP Armor is designed to resist against puncture and abrasion injuries. Hard cup armor is very strong and often found in high-performance, high-speed applications, like sports jackets and race suits.

As you can see here in this Spidi Track Wind Pro. This type of armor is often built permanently into items like gloves but when it comes to jackets, pants, and suits, it’s usually removable in specially designed compartments, to hold it in place for maximum protection. The new player in protection materials is viscoelastic armor such as D30. This is very similar to memory foam and that it is soft, body-forming and extremely comfortable. What makes this better than traditional foams though is that it becomes rigid upon impact, meaning it can absorb high levels of energy while still remaining thin and flexible.

This is what you’ll normally find in quality jackets, pants, and suits such as Icon or let’s say Klim technical riding gear.

Now, with all these variations in armor, it would be nice if there was some sort of rating system that was used to designate the level of protection each time it gets you, right? Well, there is and it’s called the CE rating system. Now, you may have heard the term CE rated or maybe CE approved in the past but you weren’t clear on what it meant.

Now, CE stands for Conformité Européenne and refers to a system of safety standards used to test all sorts of motorcycle armor sold in the European Union. So when a product is CE rated, it simply means that a particular piece of armor meets the European standard for safety, that’s really it.

Now, American manufacturers and retailers have unofficially adopted the European system because it’s comprehensive, it’s easy to use and frankly, it’s because the U.S. doesn’t have a comparable system currently in place.

The CE rating system comes in levels, which makes it easier for you to know how much protection you’re getting for the money. The test goes something like this, an 11-pound weight, gets dropped from roughly six feet up onto the piece of specified armor nine different times. So, to obtain a level one certification, no more than 18 kilonewtons can be transmitted through and no one impact can exceed 24 kilonewtons. As you can see here, this D30 Viper Stealth Back Protector has a level one certification. So to obtain level two certification, only nine kilonewtons can be transmitted through and no one impact can exceed 12 kilonewtons. As you can see here, this D30 Viper Pro Back Protector has a level two safety certification.

Now, some armor can you protect you even more than that.

Forcefield, a major player in the soft armor marketplace makes a back protector called the Pro Sub 4 as it transmits less than four kilonewtons through to the rider and that my friends, that is an impressive number. So remember this when you’re looking at purchasing armor. While there may be cheaper pieces out on the market, be sure to check for a CE rating to ensure that you’re getting quality armor that you know will protect you when you need it most.

So aside from the rating, one very important thing to look for in motorcycle armor, is that it fits properly. Armor should be just big enough to cover the joints or limits it’s designed for while being as small as possible to reduce weight and bulk.

For example, check out this Blast Jacket from AGV Sport which fits Shane perfectly. The shoulder, elbow and back armor are positioned right where they should be and they fit snug to his body so that they won’t shift around in a slide or a tumble. But now if we move up a couple of sizes, you can see how the armor is no longer where it needs to be and will easily shift around during an impact. That means this armor can’t do its job and maybe just as bad as having no armor at all. Fit is absolutely crucial in motorcycle gear and even more so when armor is involved.

Finally, let’s talk about replacing armor. Now, some folks think that armor is meant to be replaced after just one crash but that’s not always the case, some armor’s designed to take multiple impacts and still be fine, such as the Seeflex Armor from REV’IT. Now, on the other end of the spectrum would be back protectors that are built, let’s say on a grid system such as the Spidi Warrior. Now, once the integrity of the grid has been compromised that armor should be replaced. Now, there’s also no law that requires armors to be replaced after a crash so you personally need to visually inspect your armor and replace it if needed.

So, there you have it just a quick overview on street motorcycling armor. We hope that you found this video helpful. If you’re ready to make an investment in your safety, here’s a link so that you can shop for the armor and the protective gear that best fits your needs and don’t ever hesitate to contact us with any questions that you have. We’re always here to help guide you for the products that will be the perfect fit for you.

Thanks for watching. If this is your first time here in the BikeBandit Garage, do yourself a favor and hit the red button and subscribe to our channel. With each new video, you’ll be in the loop learning more about motorcycles and all sorts of topics pertaining to them.

Thanks again for joining us, we’ll see you soon. Now, it’s time to go ride.

Video: How to Dirt Bike 4-Stroke Top End Rebuild

Welcome to Transworld Motocross “How To” presented by BikeBandit. Hi, I’m Steve Matthes, Transworld Motocross, editor at large and winner of the 2005 Orlando Supercross MMI Top Tech award.This week on the Transworld motocross “How To”, presented by BikeBandit, I’m gonna show you on a Kawi 450, how to install a top-end, let’s get busy.

All right, so what we’re going to do is the Top End Rebuild here. I’ve taken the sub-frame off, the shock off, at least removed the shock a little bit. I’ve taken the carburetor off, you can let it hang down here. I’ve drained the coolant, taken the motor mounts off, tank obviously you wanna get everything as much out of the way as you can to start. It makes it a whole lot easier coming down the road What you can do now is simply remove the valve cover, be careful of that gasket on the top. Usually, you can reuse this top gasket, it just stays on there.

Come around to this side of the bike, you’re gonna have the time it, so remove your timing covers, here and here, as well your cam chain tensioner bolt and there is always a little O-ring in there, I’ll get that in a second. And then now you’re ready to actually start taking it apart, but first, you must find Top Dead Center.

All right, so another good trick is to take the spark plug out, I’ve learned that over the years. Take out the spark plug cap rubber dampener out. Now we got to find Top Dead Center, it’s always a place to start and finish when you’re installing a new Top End or cams either one. So what you wanna do is basically, a good rule of thumb, kick the bike over, when the lobes are facing opposite of each other that is one you know you’re close to being top dead center. What I like to do is just stick a screwdriver down in there or something like that, come back around here. You’re gonna have timing marks right here to line up but every manufacturer is a little different, some are right in the center, some are off to the side a little bit, but you’ll see a mark that will be on the starter, and there will be one on the flywheel and you line that up. As you can see the screwdriver is going down so that was not top dead center and we’re back up again. The cam lobes are facing apart from one another. All right, so I’ve put a T-handle on here because I missed top dead center. Kicking it over and I just brought it up. You can feel the screwdriver moving up and down so you have a good gauge on where the top dead center is and it’s right there. And just to make sure there’s marks on the camshaft as well that lineup horizontal with the top of the cylinder head, so now I have top dead center and now what I wanna do is take the screwdriver and turn the cam chain tensioner all the way in and you have to put a little bit of force on it to make it stick. But once you do that you should be good to go.

Take the cam caps off and begin the real dis-assembly. All right, I’ve got the cam chain tensioner in, the tension is off the chain here, I’ve released the camp cap bolts, what you want to do with these is loosen and tighten in a specific pattern, so go crossways, start from the inside. Every model is a little different. On the Kawi here they have oil passages between the cam caps to keep everything lubricated and so on this particular model you gonna wanna be very careful as you take the cam caps off. You wanna take them off as a set and that you want them to come together and come off the same. And sometimes they’re a little tight so just simply take a T-handle and knock it a little bit. Again, be careful when you’re taking these off, there’s dowels, there’s pins. This one didn’t come off the way I wanted it to, as one piece but I have the oil passageways. Again there’s dowels in there be careful over those, don’t drop nothing in the motor.

A real good way to do things is to simply put them back on the bench the way you took them off. All right, the cams are off. I removed the two bolts on this side here, cylinder bolts as well as cylinder head bolts. I’ve taken these cylinder…the long cylinder head bolts out, you wanna tighten them in a crisscross pattern, as well you wanna loosen them in a crisscross pattern. I’ve got three of them out, heres my last one. Pay attention to the washer that’s on them as well there will be a washer down each one. As well, pay attention to the length of these and make sure you put the right length into the right hole when you go put them back together, so that’s that and now the cylinder head itself is ready for removal.

You’re gonna have a chain tensioner there and just simply take it out. Again, pay attention to your dowels. This one here I got lucky they’re in the bottom of the head so I don’t have to worry about it. We’ve had Top dead center so we’re not gonna drop nothing down there and now we’re able to take the cylinder off.

All right, the heads off. Take the cam chain guide off. There’s always one that comes out that’s marked, the other one is bolted to the bottom, remove that. Take the gasket out, all right. Just slowly work your cylinder back and forth, like so again, be weary of your dowels, this one… I have one in the case, one on the cylinder and voila! The cylinder comes out.

Always a good idea to take some paper towel as soon as you get the cylinder out and stick it on down there, so anything that potentially could drop down there stays on a paper towel and then you don’t display your cases.

All right, I’ve got a screwdriver in there, I pop the circlip out on one side. You don’t need to do both sides because you’re taking it off and sometimes these wrist pins are a little touchy, sometimes they’re little sticky so just get a mallet and a T-handle, punch it out and now the piston has come out of the bike. All right, so what we’ve done is we’ve cleaned the surface here, we’ve installed new gaskets, put the dowels in, here’s the piston. Always look for the mark that tells you which side of the exhaust, this is a four valve motor, so easy to mix up so put the marking on the piston towards the exhaust, as well when you install the rings and the oil rings, there is a mark on the ring, put that facing upwards to the top. And the oil rings…there’s two oil rings and then a seal ring and what I like to do is put the openings across from each other, so you’ll see one is here and one is there. Don’t try to mix them up, it hurts the oil flow. So, yeah basically, we’re ready to install so line up your ring, I always put it at the back. Now one thing you’ll notice through this whole install is that lubrication is your friend, so I’ve got the maxima oil on here and basically gonna drop this in here.

Something I forgot to mention was I installed the circlip while the piston was on the bench so that’ll save you some time as well as in case you drop it or whatever it lessens your odds of that. One circlip is installed, the left-hand side one is and I just put some lube on the wrist pin and voila! I’ve worked both sides in there and I’m looking for a click, which I just heard. And now you know that the circlip is installed correctly all the way in.

All right, it’s cleared the rings, I’ve use my fingers to hold the rings and slowly work the cylinder down on the gaskets. Make sure your cam chain isn’t tight, isn’t caught and make sure your dowels are in place and cylinder is on. Wipe off your excess oil and it’s time to install the cylinder head. All right cylinder is getting ready, very important tip here, Bob Oliver at Yamaha taught me this, and he’s put together enough of these. Lube the walls of the cylinder upon install, it will always help out. That is done and now we will put it on the machine.

All right, what I’ve done here is I clean the surface, clean the oil off, picked the cam chain up, laid it to the side. Got a new gasket here and the gasket can only go one way, so you will see by the notch on it which way goes to the forward, and the dowels are in and voila! Some people worry about the cam chain and getting it caught with a clothes hanger or something but you can reach down there and get it with an Allen key, I’ll show you in a second. So I just leave that thing in there, I let it just fall down but you do want to put the other guide in. That just slips in, grab the chain, here we go. Drop the other guide, right in there you’ll feel it, it will notch in there and sit in the bottom. Put the cam chain like so, make sure you have the gasket on the right way.

Time for the install of the cylinder head now. Make sure your guides are good, oh and here’s a little tip too, folks, when you cleaning a shim and bucket system cylinder head and you’re scraping the gasket off and your tilting it, don’t tilt it too far otherwise you’ll find those buckets could fall out on you and the shims could fall out and then you’re lost so, FYI on that. Line this up like so and now you’re ready for the bolts.

Okay, cylinder head is on, I went down to grabbed the cam chain with an Allen key. I just reached down there and grabbed it, pulled the cam chain up. Again we’re at top dead center, just slide a screwdriver something in there to hold it for a little bit and now it’s time for the bolts. Remember I said pay attention to the washers? Pay attention to the length of the bolts? Well, that’s why it all comes in handy right now. What you want to do is drop the bolts in, clean them, lube them up with a little bit of Moly lube so that they are nice and good to screw into the threads and drop them in there. All right, the bolts are down and just like I said take them apart in a crisscross manner, you wanna tighten them in a crisscross manner. Now, the correct torque for this is 46 foot-pounds but you don’t just want to torque one 46 and the other 46, it is very important that the cylinder head and the cylinder go down equally, so I’ve set my torque wrench at 23 foot-pound which is half the torque that I need and I will now attempt to…keyword attempt, to torque them. All right, bolts are torqued, lube is your friend always so we’ve got some Moly lube in here. Put it all in the channels where the cams are gonna sit and then will help it on braking, its Lucas Oil lubrication. Cam chain is being held in torque close, tension is off, I always start with the exhaust cam, I think you probably should too. See the line right there? Well, we’re at top dead center in the piston we know and that lining should be horizontal with the top of the cylinder head. Let’s attempt to do this here. It’s weird with a camera right here but basically, pull up the cam chain as taut as you can get it and drop the cam into the channel. You see right there? I’m a little high so what I’m gonna do is back the cam chain off one, go down to the next to tooth on the chain and that mark is horizontal to the top of the cylinder head.

We’ve got the exhaust in, now it’s time for the intake and again put the cam lobes at about 3:00 o’clock, line it up with the mark on the exhaust and you can see that I’m off quite a bit there. So what I’m gonna do, readjust. This is very important folks so make sure, drop it in there, see I’m about a tooth high, you see that little mark in there? Right about where my thumb is? I’m off one tooth. So simply take it apart, drop the intake, one tooth like so and there we go. We’re level with the part, with the top of the cylinder head, both parts are level, and I’m top dead center on my piston so now it’s time for tightening the cam caps. I’m gonna put the retainer clips in for centering the cams. Again, my dowels are in, good to put them all into the cylinder head before you put the cam caps on. And a Kawasaki, as we spoke about in the intro, has the oil passage lines running through it and it’s best to install it all as one set. So simply push them together like so and drop them in together onto the cams. Be careful when you’re doing this, you got the clips, you got the oil lines, and you got the dowels, make sure everything is lined up. Okay, the cam caps have gone on and now put the cam bolts back in, and again pay attention to which ones go where. All right, cam cap cover bolts are finger tight, torque on those eight foot-pounds same thing as the cylinder base bolts. I went half at first and I’m gonna go in a crisscross pattern, so four-foot pounds, crisscross, tighten everything down equally and I have nice symmetry and I will go, now eight.

Cam caps are tight, always a good idea to kick it over. Of course as spark plug out right now and then we found top dead center as you know but I always want to check before I go in, so I’ll just get a T-handle or a screwdriver, something drop it down in there and I’ll find top dead center with it and I’ll double check my marks which we’re good. Top Dead Center has been found, everything is tight, now to finish the job. All right, spark plug is in, don’t forget the spark plug cap, fits on over top. We’ve got a new gasket here, you can put a little bit of silicon on that gasket if you want to help it stay in place but it finds a home pretty easy. Drop the valve cover on and that’s it. You’ve now done a top end on your 454 Stroke and that has been Transworld Motocross’ “How To” presented by BikeBandit.

Video | BikeBandit.com How-To: Dirt Bike Air Filter Cleaning

Hi, I’m Steve Matthis. You might remember me from being the winning mechanic at the 1999 Summercross. Well, this week on the Transworld Bike Bandit how to, I’m gonna show you how to change an air filter.

The air filter, one of the cheapest things on your bike, is also one of the most important. What you wanna do is make sure that it’s kept clean at all times. This affects the reliability and the performance to your machine. Basically, the Transworld Motocross guys here have left me with a pretty dirty one. So get some gloves from your local doctor’s office or you can buy them.

And you wanna be careful when you reach into the air box to take out a dirty air filter. Lots of times they’ll be dirt and debris on it and you can drop back down into the boot and affect your motor. So unscrew the bolt, there’s not a lot of room on these new four-strokes either for the airbox. So extra special attention. Turning, turning, turning still turning. Take out the bolt, turn the filter sideways and voila, there you have it. Like I said, the Transworld Motocross guys, they don’t do their maintenance. A dirty filter.

When I clean the air box, I like to use Maxima contact cleaner. Basically get a rag, get your contact cleaner. Spray some on there and just reach down and clean that lip, get all the dirt and debris out. Clean the backside of the airbox. As a factory mechanic, you’ll see a lot of times at the races, the mechanics will have the whole subframe pulled off. They don’t wanna risk dropping even the tiniest little bit of dirt down in there. But for this purpose, and for most guys, you can just use contact cleaner and a rag.

For those of you that don’t have fresh clean filter oils at home, what you wanna do is you take your dirty filter, get a bucket, maybe some solvent, little bit of gasoline, Maxima air filter cleaner. Basically, spray that in there and work it around the filter. But it’s not how we roll here at Transworld. We have a new pro-filter oiled and ready to go into the bike. So the new filter, ready to go and oiled, you wanna install into the bike. For sandy tracks or some mud, water, that sort of stuff, you can put the Maxima grease along the lip. Always like to do that at Southwick seemed to help my riders performance. But we’re going to go without that today. So as I took it out, I twisted the air filter. When I’m putting it back in, wanna twist it again. Drop it in there and again, visually check and make sure that you have all the tabs lined up. Pull it back a little bit. I like to do that to get the threads started. And simply start installing the air filter.

And again, I can’t stress how important it is to keep a fresh filter on your bike. It improves the reliability, improves the performance of it. And it’s an easy thing to do to your bike and that and oil changes, keep up on it. With that, that’s the Bike Bandit how to of the week.

Video | BikeBandit.com How-To: Dirt Bike Air Filter Cleaning

Hi, I’m Steve Matthis. You might remember me from being the winning mechanic at the 1999 Summercross. Well, this week on the Transworld Bike Bandit how to, I’m gonna show you how to change an air filter.

The air filter, one of the cheapest things on your bike, is also one of the most important. What you wanna do is make sure that it’s kept clean at all times. This affects the reliability and the performance to your machine. Basically, the Transworld Motocross guys here have left me with a pretty dirty one. So get some gloves from your local doctor’s office or you can buy them.

And you wanna be careful when you reach into the air box to take out a dirty air filter. Lots of times they’ll be dirt and debris on it and you can drop back down into the boot and affect your motor. So unscrew the bolt, there’s not a lot of room on these new four-strokes either for the airbox. So extra special attention. Turning, turning, turning still turning. Take out the bolt, turn the filter sideways and voila, there you have it. Like I said, the Transworld Motocross guys, they don’t do their maintenance. A dirty filter.

When I clean the air box, I like to use Maxima contact cleaner. Basically get a rag, get your contact cleaner. Spray some on there and just reach down and clean that lip, get all the dirt and debris out. Clean the backside of the airbox. As a factory mechanic, you’ll see a lot of times at the races, the mechanics will have the whole subframe pulled off. They don’t wanna risk dropping even the tiniest little bit of dirt down in there. But for this purpose, and for most guys, you can just use contact cleaner and a rag.

For those of you that don’t have fresh clean filter oils at home, what you wanna do is you take your dirty filter, get a bucket, maybe some solvent, little bit of gasoline, Maxima air filter cleaner. Basically, spray that in there and work it around the filter. But it’s not how we roll here at Transworld. We have a new pro-filter oiled and ready to go into the bike. So the new filter, ready to go and oiled, you wanna install into the bike. For sandy tracks or some mud, water, that sort of stuff, you can put the Maxima grease along the lip. Always like to do that at Southwick seemed to help my riders performance. But we’re going to go without that today. So as I took it out, I twisted the air filter. When I’m putting it back in, wanna twist it again. Drop it in there and again, visually check and make sure that you have all the tabs lined up. Pull it back a little bit. I like to do that to get the threads started. And simply start installing the air filter.

And again, I can’t stress how important it is to keep a fresh filter on your bike. It improves the reliability, improves the performance of it. And it’s an easy thing to do to your bike and that and oil changes, keep up on it. With that, that’s the Bike Bandit how to of the week.

Video | BikeBandit.com How-To: Dirt Bike Air Filter Cleaning

Hi, I’m Steve Matthis. You might remember me from being the winning mechanic at the 1999 Summercross. Well, this week on the Transworld Bike Bandit how to, I’m gonna show you how to change an air filter.

The air filter, one of the cheapest things on your bike, is also one of the most important. What you wanna do is make sure that it’s kept clean at all times. This affects the reliability and the performance to your machine. Basically, the Transworld Motocross guys here have left me with a pretty dirty one. So get some gloves from your local doctor’s office or you can buy them.

And you wanna be careful when you reach into the air box to take out a dirty air filter. Lots of times they’ll be dirt and debris on it and you can drop back down into the boot and affect your motor. So unscrew the bolt, there’s not a lot of room on these new four-strokes either for the airbox. So extra special attention. Turning, turning, turning still turning. Take out the bolt, turn the filter sideways and voila, there you have it. Like I said, the Transworld Motocross guys, they don’t do their maintenance. A dirty filter.

When I clean the air box, I like to use Maxima contact cleaner. Basically get a rag, get your contact cleaner. Spray some on there and just reach down and clean that lip, get all the dirt and debris out. Clean the backside of the airbox. As a factory mechanic, you’ll see a lot of times at the races, the mechanics will have the whole subframe pulled off. They don’t wanna risk dropping even the tiniest little bit of dirt down in there. But for this purpose, and for most guys, you can just use contact cleaner and a rag.

For those of you that don’t have fresh clean filter oils at home, what you wanna do is you take your dirty filter, get a bucket, maybe some solvent, little bit of gasoline, Maxima air filter cleaner. Basically, spray that in there and work it around the filter. But it’s not how we roll here at Transworld. We have a new pro-filter oiled and ready to go into the bike. So the new filter, ready to go and oiled, you wanna install into the bike. For sandy tracks or some mud, water, that sort of stuff, you can put the Maxima grease along the lip. Always like to do that at Southwick seemed to help my riders performance. But we’re going to go without that today. So as I took it out, I twisted the air filter. When I’m putting it back in, wanna twist it again. Drop it in there and again, visually check and make sure that you have all the tabs lined up. Pull it back a little bit. I like to do that to get the threads started. And simply start installing the air filter.

And again, I can’t stress how important it is to keep a fresh filter on your bike. It improves the reliability, improves the performance of it. And it’s an easy thing to do to your bike and that and oil changes, keep up on it. With that, that’s the Bike Bandit how to of the week.

Video | BikeBandit.com How-To: Dirt Bike Air Filter Cleaning

Hi, I’m Steve Matthis. You might remember me from being the winning mechanic at the 1999 Summercross. Well, this week on the Transworld Bike Bandit how to, I’m gonna show you how to change an air filter.

The air filter, one of the cheapest things on your bike, is also one of the most important. What you wanna do is make sure that it’s kept clean at all times. This affects the reliability and the performance to your machine. Basically, the Transworld Motocross guys here have left me with a pretty dirty one. So get some gloves from your local doctor’s office or you can buy them.

And you wanna be careful when you reach into the air box to take out a dirty air filter. Lots of times they’ll be dirt and debris on it and you can drop back down into the boot and affect your motor. So unscrew the bolt, there’s not a lot of room on these new four-strokes either for the airbox. So extra special attention. Turning, turning, turning still turning. Take out the bolt, turn the filter sideways and voila, there you have it. Like I said, the Transworld Motocross guys, they don’t do their maintenance. A dirty filter.

When I clean the air box, I like to use Maxima contact cleaner. Basically get a rag, get your contact cleaner. Spray some on there and just reach down and clean that lip, get all the dirt and debris out. Clean the backside of the airbox. As a factory mechanic, you’ll see a lot of times at the races, the mechanics will have the whole subframe pulled off. They don’t wanna risk dropping even the tiniest little bit of dirt down in there. But for this purpose, and for most guys, you can just use contact cleaner and a rag.

For those of you that don’t have fresh clean filter oils at home, what you wanna do is you take your dirty filter, get a bucket, maybe some solvent, little bit of gasoline, Maxima air filter cleaner. Basically, spray that in there and work it around the filter. But it’s not how we roll here at Transworld. We have a new pro-filter oiled and ready to go into the bike. So the new filter, ready to go and oiled, you wanna install into the bike. For sandy tracks or some mud, water, that sort of stuff, you can put the Maxima grease along the lip. Always like to do that at Southwick seemed to help my riders performance. But we’re going to go without that today. So as I took it out, I twisted the air filter. When I’m putting it back in, wanna twist it again. Drop it in there and again, visually check and make sure that you have all the tabs lined up. Pull it back a little bit. I like to do that to get the threads started. And simply start installing the air filter.

And again, I can’t stress how important it is to keep a fresh filter on your bike. It improves the reliability, improves the performance of it. And it’s an easy thing to do to your bike and that and oil changes, keep up on it. With that, that’s the Bike Bandit how to of the week.

Video: How to Dirt Bike Oil Change

Hi, I’m Steve Matthes, mechanic to the stars. Also the editor-at-large at Transworld Motocross. Here we are outside running a CRF 450 because today, with the help of Maxima Oil, we’re gonna show you how to do an oil change, and that’s this week’s Transworld Motocross “How To”, presented by Bike Bandit.

Alright, this being a Honda, and like I said earlier, oil in the motor and oil in the tranny. We’ve got some Maxima products here. Motorcycle transmission lube, guess what? That goes in the tranny. The motor lube is an ultra-performance, four-cycle motor. This has molly in it, so this is better for slippage and lubrication throughout the piston, the rings, and the crank, and everything else. So put the molly in the motor. Put the transmission without the molly into the transmission. Alright, we’ve got the bike inside here, and I always recommend running it to get the oil nice and hot, get it out easier. Honda’s have a couple of drain spots, one for the motor, one for the transmission. The transmission is back here. It’s a 12mm. And we’re gonna be doing a filter today as well. So just pull that out. We’ve got our drain pan ready, and always try to pull the washer off with it. And there we go. Makes a little bit of mess, but we’ll clean up. Now for the motor, down here on the stator…And we’re pulling that out, and there we go. There she blows.

We’re gonna do a filter in this bike also. So, the drain bolts are back in, and let’s take the old filter out. When you do a filter, you’re gonna need to add a bit more oil. There’s always a spring behind there that doesn’t come in the kit. So make sure you catch that. There’s the old filter. That’s no good anymore. Take this, clean it with contact cleaner, clean the spring out. You could even stick a rag in there, and wipe the excess oil away… Alright, we’ve got the new filter here. We’ve got the spring, gonna drop that in there. A good idea is to just use some new or used oil, coat that seal a little bit, just helps down the road, helps with install and initial startup. And you wanna just slide that filter in. Alright, spring is in, seal is in, seals been oiled a little bit, and I recommend doing the oil filter, no matter what brand it’s on, every second oil change. You don’t need to do it every oil change. So save yourself a little bit of money, do it every second time.

Alright, and then the motor side calls for 700cc’s. So we’ve got five right there…gonna do two more. Down the hatch she goes…And now for the tranny. And for the transmission side, it calls for a 1,000, which is one liter, a 1,000 milliliters, which is one liter. By the way, the Canadians enjoy the metric system, perhaps you Americans should look into it. Anyways, the entire 1,000 milliliters goes into the transmission side of a Honda. Nice, new oil, fresh ride thanks to Maxima. This Honda is ready to go. There’s an oil change for you on a Honda CRF 450, in this weeks Transworld Motocross “How To” presented by Bike Bandit. See ya next week.

Video: How to Rejet Carburetors

Hi, I’m Steve Matthes, 2003 Budds Creek first moto winning mechanic and I’m also Transworld Motocross editor at large. Carburetor’s on four strokes are scary things to a lot of people but I’m here to show you guys it’s not so scary. And with a little bit of knowledge and a little bit of tuning, you can have your bike running perfect. This week on the Transworld Motocross How To presented by Bike Bandit, we’re gonna talk about carburetors.

All right, so I’ve removed the carburetor from the motorcycle. I’ve taken the top lid off as well, taken off the opening to the needle jet. And what you can do is move the slide up, reach down in there and pull out the needle. As well, I’ve taken off the four screws on the bottom of the flow pull. Taken that off and exposed the main jet and the pilot jet. All right, so the needle affects your powerband throughout most of the range. And it’s a pretty massive change to make one clip difference. So what we’re gonna do here is I’m gonna show you how to make the bike a little richer. So if we take the needle, put it on a flat surface like your toolbox or somewhere, push down with your thumb. Now, make sure you count the number of clips slots that the clip is down. This one, in particular, is down four from the top, always count from the top. So what I wanna do is make it a little bit richer. So I’m gonna move it down to the fifth one which, in effect…push it back down, it’s on the fifth slot. What that does is raise the needle up and allow more fuel into the carburetor, thereby making your bike work a little richer.

All right, so what we’ve done is made the needle richer but you can also do the opposite, which is make it leaner. You would want to raise the clip, drop the needle, that’ll make it leaner. Make the bike have less fuel, give it a little bit of throttle response, and you’ll notice the difference of the seat of the power plants immediately upon doing that. Loosened the main jet already. Here is the main jet, this is a 175. On the main jet, the bigger number means richer. So if you want more fuel…and this jet controls three-quarters to a wide open throttle. So if you want more fuel, if you’re getting cracking, popping up top, you’d wanna go to a 178, which is the next step up, or a 180 even. The bigger number on the main jet means more fuel.

All right, well for the purposes of this video, I took the bottom flow pull off. But what you can do is simply take out this 17 drain bolt on the bottom and you can get to your main jet and your pilot jet this way, so you can tilt the carburetor on your bike. Now, most people, they talk about a leak jet and a diaphragm. I find that in today’s bikes they’re jetted pretty well. You shouldn’t need to really adjust those too much. The diaphragm you can go up in sizes and the leak jet the same thing, which controls the amount of fuel that gets onto your diaphragm. But I would recommend between a pilot and a main, and a needle, you can make any change you want. Look in your owners manual, it tells you what kind of conditions to go richer, what kind of conditions to go lower, or leaner I should say and you’ll go from there. While the carburetor’s off, while it’s on the bench, it’s a good idea to check your air screw, and you should probably put that somewhere about…count the turns. This one is one, one and a half, this one’s one and three-quarters. Probably not a bad place to start, but I like to go one and a half. There’s one, and there’s a half. And bikebandit.com will sell you a easy tool to get in there while you can do this on the bike.

All right, now what I’m doing is taking out the pilot jet. The pilot is anywhere from close throttle to a quarter throttle. If you notice your bike maybe hesitating a little bit, you probably need to go richer on the pilot jet. Same thing as the main jet, the bigger number, the more fuel.

So this is a 42 and you can see the number on the side of it. Same as the main jet. So if you’re noticing a little bit of cracking, a little bit of popping on the bottom, go to a 45. It’s pretty easy to do, pretty easy to change. So drop the 45 in there, and you’ll get more fuel in there, and that’ll solve that problem.

All right, so there you have it. I’ve covered the main jet, the pilot jet, and the needle jet, the three jets that are the most important in your carburetor. If you have a fuel injected bike, scratch everything I just said. It’ll be jetted for you perfectly all the time. But for now, don’t be scared. Get in there, tinker a little bit, make your bike work better. Adjust it for altitude, adjust it for track conditions. Read your manual, it’s pretty easy stuff. All right, and this is Transworld Motocross’s How To, presented by Bike Bandit. Get on it.

Video: How to Dirt Bike Brake Bleeding

Hi, I’m Steve Matthes. Welcome to Transworld Motocross How-tos, presented by BikeBandit.

As we all know, your brakes are very, very important. They enable you to stop your motorcycle, so they’re key. What many of you probably don’t realize is that you do need to change your brake fluid every now and then, and basically replenish the system. The stock brake fluid isn’t always the best, so what we’re going to do this week, with the help of Maxima and Motion Pro, is change your brake fluid.

All right, for this tip, we’re gonna use a Cowley 250-F, and what you wanna do is, with your front master cylinder, make it as level as you can for filling up purposes. I’m gonna use a Motion Pro brake bleeder. And, let me tell you folks, you could make this yourself with using your fuel line or whatever, but for $19.50, this will make your life a whole lot easier. It’s got a one-way check valve in it, and none of this fiddling around and chucking air back into your system, so I highly recommend this. We’re also gonna use Maxima racing brake fluid for this tip.

So, what you’ll need is a Phillips screwdriver to remove the screws. And, on older bikes, this is gonna stick a little bit, so just wiggle it with your hands, pull it up, make sure you try not to spill any, and try to keep that diaphragm cap on the master cylinder cap. Find the bleeder screw on your front caliper or your rear caliper.

What I’ve done is… It helps to have a catch can of some sort. You can use almost anything. I’ve just used an old soda bottle with some tape.

And what you basically do is, put the end on there, like so. The brake bleeder has an arrow to show you which end goes onto the caliper, and just crack that open a little bit. Just slowly crack it open. Come to the top, top master cylinder, and just slowly add some brake fluid, and just slowly work it through the system. And what you can do is, make sure you don’t get too low and start sucking in air, otherwise, you’ll be right back to where you started.

And, as you can see below, I’m pushing fluid through the system and it’s coming out. And it was coming out pretty dirty, and now, because we’ve reintroduced some new brake fluid, it’s pretty clean. And that’s where your catch can comes into place, too, so you don’t make a mess on Mom’s floor.

The final step is… You’ve introduced new brake fluid through the system. You can see that it’s clean. What I like to do is, you close the valve back up the bleeder screw and just manually pump a few more cc’s through the system. So what you wanna do is pump your front brake lever up, or rear brake pedal, hold it, crack it open, bleed it through manually a couple times. Make sure you close that bleeder screw tight, come up to the top, and you wanna be careful you don’t overfill the front master cylinder or the rear one, about three-quarter level. The diaphragm will take up the rest of the room.

And there you have it. Fresh brakes, fresh stopping power. I’m Steve Matthes, and that was Transworld Motocross How-tos, presented by BikeBandit.